Call Us:

919-969-9611

Patient-focused primary care pediatricians serving Chapel Hill, Carrboro, Pittsboro and Mebane North Carolina.

Village Pediatrics specializes in pediatric medicine for a child & physical, emotional and developmental health.


Confirm Appointments During the Storm

PLEASE CALL US BEFORE LEAVING FOR YOUR APPOINTMENT!
Don't risk life & limb on the road during inclement weather! Before leaving home for your appointment, please call us at 919 969 9611 to confirm we have arrived & are open for your appointment.  We anticipate normal operating hours but this may change as weather conditions persist.  Staff will arrive as early as is safely possible.  IF the office is closed & we are unavailable for your appointment, WE WILL CONTACT YOU TO RESCHEDULE.  Please be sure your voice mail identifies the family name and tel# so that we may leave a detailed message.
 
Thank you!

 

Prepare for Hurricane Florence!

With Hurricane Florence bearing down on us, take steps now to make sure that you and your family are safe. You can find more information here: www.nhc.noaa.gov

Also, here is a great website for kids about preparing for disasters.  Be sure to get them involved - they might even have fun with it! www.ready.gov

 
 
Tips for getting started:
 
Basic Disaster Supplies Kit
 
To assemble your kit, store items in airtight plastic bags and put your entire disaster supplies kit in one or two easy-to-carry containers such as plastic bins or a duffel bag.

A basic emergency supply kit could include the following recommended items:

Water - one gallon of water per person per day for at least three days, for drinking and sanitation
Food - at least a three-day supply of non-perishable food
Battery-powered or hand crank radio and a NOAA Weather Radio with tone alert
Flashlight
First aid kit
Extra batteries
Whistle to signal for help
Dust mask to help filter contaminated air and plastic sheeting and duct tape to shelter-in-place
Moist towelettes, garbage bags and plastic ties for personal sanitation
Wrench or pliers to turn off utilities
Manual can opener for food
Local maps
Cell phone with chargers and a backup battery
 
 
 
Develop and document plans for your specific risks:

Protect yourself and family with a Family Emergency Plan
Be sure to plan for locations away from home
Pet owners should have plans to care for their animals. The Centers for Disease Control & Prevention offer information on animal health impacts in evacuation shelters.
Prepare your boat and be aware of marine safety if you are on or near the water.
 

October is Flu Vaccine Month!!

We will be offering the quadrivalent influenza vaccine to children 6 months and older AND their parents!
These can be given at your childs' regular wellness appointment or during our special flu clinics.
We are also offering FluMist- nasal vaccine for children ages 2 and up.
October’s flu clinic schedule is posted below.
Please call to reserve your space and let us know if your child prefers the FluMist vaccine.
 
October 2018
Every Monday 3:30pm - 4:30pm
Every Tuesday 9:00am - 11:00am
Every Wednesday 3:30pm - 4:30pm
 
Friday October 5th- 3:30pm - 4:30pm
Friday October 12th- 3:30pm - 4:30pm
 
Saturday October 13th- 8:00am - 12:00pm
Saturday October 20th- 8:00am - 12:00pm
 
 

Recall Notice!

Children's Advil bubble gum flavor recalled due to overdose concerns

Heads up, parents: Children’s Advil Suspension Bubble Gum flavor has been voluntarily recalled due to overdose concerns.
 
 
Tylenol and Motrin Doses

Acetaminophen (Tylenol, Feverall) and Ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil) are medications used for treating pain and fever in infants, children and adults. The dosing of these medications is based on WEIGHT, not age. Make sure that you know your child’s weight before consulting this document. Fever is not dangerous, as long as the condition causing it (such as a virus) is not dangerous. We recommend only treating a fever if it is greater than 100.5 and the child is uncomfortable, or if you are putting a child to bed knowing their low-grade fever is likely to rise.

Temperature in infants under 12 weeks of age is most accurately measured by a rectal thermometer. Temporal thermometers(used over the forehead)can be used after 12 weeks, and ear thermometers after 6 months. Axillary (under the arm) temperatures are acceptable for children 2 months of age and older. Oral thermometers are useful only when a child can hold the instrument under her tongue for several minutes without biting(usually after age 5.)

We recommend starting with the appropriate dose of acetaminophen. If the fever is greater than 102.5, and has not decreased an hour after treatment, you may supplement with a dose of ibuprofen. Acetominophen and ibuprofen are different types of medications, thus may be used together without adverse effect. However, we only recommend using them in tandem for persistently high fevers or discomfort. In these situations, you can alternate the medications using each type every 6 hours, but alternating every 3 hours. For example, Acetaminophen at 12 noon, Ibuprofen at 3 pm, Acetaminophen at 6 pm, Ibuprofen at 9 pm. This helps avoid spikes in the child’s fever as the medication wears off. Neither medication should be used more than 4 times a day, nor should you continue this pattern for more than 24 hours without consulting you physician.

Acetaminophen suppositories are available as Feverall without a prescription at your pharmacy. These are useful for children who are vomiting, or refuse to take oral medications. Lubricate the suppository with a little Vaseline or diaper cream, and insert in your child’s rectum with them lying on their side, knees to the chest. Hold the buttocks closed for a few minutes to assure absorption.

Important Considerations

Never give these medications to an infant less then 8 weeks of age without first consulting your pediatrician.

Always use the measuring device included with your medication. Tylenol Infant Drops include a dropper or syringe inside the package. Children’s Tylenol Suspension or Liquid comes with a special dosage cup in the package. If you misplace the cup or dropper, please call the office or your pharmacist for advice. Do not use kitchen spoons or attempt to “eyeball” the correct amount. The dosage is very specific and too much can cause problems.

Always consult our office or your pharmacist before giving these medicines if you are giving any other medications, especially over-the-counter (OTC) medications such as cold medicine. Most OTC cold medicines already contain Acetaminophen or Ibuprofen, which could lead to overdose if given along with other Acetaminophen or Ibuprofen containing products.